CREATE Methods Group


In health research, systematic review is widely recognised as a valuable tool to guide decision makers towards implementing best practice policy and health care.

There is currently no guidance for the conduct of systematic reviews that accommodates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and understandings of evidence. Our aim is to generate systematic review guidance, tools and reporting standards that align with principles for conducting ethical research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and to embed Indigenous knowledge in review findings and recommendations.

The objectives of the CREATE Methods Group are to:

  • Explore the strengths and limitations of systematic review as a methodology for knowledge translation to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health;
  • Develop and promote the use of appropriate systematic review guidance and tools (for example critical appraisal and data extraction);
  • Develop and promote the use of standards to enhance reporting of systematic reviews of research conducted with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and
  • Promote use of the guidance and tools developed to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners and researchers through capacity strengthening initiatives.

For further information regarding the CREATE Methods Group and related activities, please contact Professor Annette Braunack-Mayer or Stephen Harfield.


Critical Appraisal through an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Lens

Objective

To develop a critical appraisal tool that appraises the ethical and methodological quality of research conducted with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.

The tool is designed to be used in conjunction with existing critical appraisal tools.

Progress to date

Senior Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researchers, together with ethicists and systematic review experts, developed a critical appraisal tool and a a companion document over a two year period, using a combination of literature review and interactive group work.  A modified Delphi method was used to assess the face validity, reliability and feasibility of the tool.  An Australian panel comprising senior Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers critiqued the tool and made recommendations for improvements.  Systematic reviewers then trialled the tool for reliability and feasibility.

The tool and companion document are being refined, and once published will be made available for use.

 

Last updated on August 22nd, 2017 at 03:30 pm